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Ceremonial Matcha Bowl
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Ceremonial Matcha Bowl
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Ceremonial Matcha Bowl
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As a child I dreamed of having one of those plastic “pottery” wheels, but it wasn’t until I was in high school that I actually got my hands on some actual clay and then sat down at a real potter’s wheel and made my first lump of a bowl. It was wonderful. I was in love with clay! In college, I indulged myself even more by majoring in studio art with a concentration in Ceramics. I spent every spare moment I had at the wheel, learning the art of centering and make pots. I started my own pottery business and plunged into the life of a potter, making pots and then schlepping them around from art show to art show in hopes to make a living. It was not easy. I did this for over ten years, dreaming of a lighter load, as I watched the painters, selling prints and packing up their booths in record speed while I wrapped up each piece of unsold pottery. Living in the depths of winter, having babies, and needing a new creative outlet I decided to challenge myself to make flat art, the kind on paper, the kind that travels easily. I started painting again. From there I started writing articles, teaching, and selling my paintings. I stopped making pots. I moved to a new state and my pottery life went into storage. Years and many studios later I set up a new clay studio. This time, with as much passion, I am going about it differently. Making pots that resonate with me and everything I have learned over my lifetime. My goal is to make pottery that wants to be held, used, and treasured. Pottery that feels sacred, pottery that feels like it’s still connected to the earth before the clay was dug up.